I did something similar for May and it was mildly successful. Here were the books I reviewed in the month of June. Book titles will send you to the full review.

The New Testament & Ethics

This book was a challenge. I was pretty put off in the opening chapters by some of the liberal mindset applied to the gospel and Christ's view of the Mosaic law. However the book balanced out well and I did thoroughly enjoy it. I'm not sure how valuable this is for straight reading and placing on the shelf but I'd find it thought provoking for a church class on ethics.

The Cross & Gendercide

Still the most personal of my reviews. This book is the must read absolutely read book on this list. Alaina and I personally funded a giveaway of this book and I'd consider doing it again if I thought there was interest. Skip a couple meals this month (turn it into fasting) and buy this book. Then slowly read it.

Death Before the Fall

This was without a doubt the biggest let down of the month. It is loaded up with good chapters but they don't balance out the wasted chapters that slam/criticizes fundamentalism. Many of those "wasted chapters" are in fact very good social and psychological reflections on the state of the church but they didn't fit the mode or purpose of this book. There are sure to be better books on this issue. I'd like to get my hands on John Lennox's Seven Day That Divide the World.

Elders in the Life of the Church

Honestly, this was the book I was least excited to read. Having just finished a shorter work on the subject I was more than a little doubtful that this would be beneficial reading. But this book surprised me with its practicality. It was enjoyable and I certainly recommend it to those interested in a weightier, but accessible, volume on elders from the Baptist perspective.

Titus For You

This is a "non-commentary" commentary for laymen and pastors. If you're confused let me explain. This was a good devotional book. It is a valuable bedside, coffee time reader for laymen in particular. If you're a Sunday School teacher who doesn't want to fork cash for a commentary (or have never even thought about buying a commentary) then this is for you. I personally consume months of monies on academic commentaries before I teach anything and a book like this would likely not get onto the list.

Grassroots Asian Theology

So this book was balm. It came to me at a time when I need to hear and read something other than what passes for evangelical Christianity (and let me be honest most "Reformed Theology"). There were some valuable challenges and very clear markers of where I need to spend more time with the Scriptures in their context. Its hard to say this is a "must read" book because I know many people won't react well to it. But it was outstanding.

A People's History of Christianity, Vol 2

This volume really can't stand alone. Its the conclusion to an excellent series from Fortress Press. These books are too sweeping to be taking up shallowly. They will be challenge to some conservative paradigms but I think that is a good thing.

The NIV Teen Study Bible

I am not against the NIV. That might be a shock to some but I do actually enjoy the translation. However, the "features" of this Bible do not line up with the theological views of my house. I imagine many in the greater evangelical world would not be quite as picky over Calvinism, Preterism and rejecting Dispensationalism. But these are important elements of theology and Biblical hermeneutics as far as I'm concerned and I would not consider letting my child use this Bible.

Perspectives on Your Child's Education

This review came in right on the deadline. I requested this one for personal interests and it didn't fail to meet expectations. The fallacy of Christian's willingly using public education was laid bare in embarrassing detail. The remaining three authors who took serious the theological implications of education presented excellent cases for their different methods of education. I am still dwelling on some of these things and continue to reap benefit from the book. 

Joshua Torrey is the sole proprietor of Torrey Gazette (don't tell Alaina) and the fullness of its editorial process. That means everything wrong with TG can legitimately be blamed on him.