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Book Review: Duck Commander Faith and Family Bible

Book Review: Duck Commander Faith and Family Bible

Publisher: Zondervan

Reading Level: Leisure

Pages: 1216

*Reviews of Bibles will depart from other reviews. They will include first person. They will address the feature content as it pertains directly to my theological positions.*

I must start this review with a confession. I did not want to like the Duck Commander Faith and Family Bible (henceforth, Duck Commander Bible). Specialized bibles often distract from the Scriptures themselves and put a popular name or word on the cover to make sales. It is my confession that I presumed the worst of the Duck Commander Bible. I expected to read “devotionals” and “talking points” that were filled with funny anecdotes but little substance.

$14.99

Well the Duck Commander Bible is full of funny anecdotes. But, besides the NKJV of the Scriptural text, it is surprisingly filled with Scripture-centered content. I am well aware that Phil and Al Robertson’s theology does not match my own in many regards. This is not something I would overlook in private discussion but the content of this Bible rarely ran hard against my own. The “Set Your Sights” feature act as a form of devotion that fills the Bible. There is a shocking amount of personal detail (e.g. 3-4, 503-504, 1033-1034). But more important is that each of the devotions quotes Scripture as it makes its main point. In addition, each “Set Your Sights” ends with an “On the Hunt” portion consisting purely of Scriptural references and texts. Far from distracting from the Scriptures that surround it, these little devotions (if one can call them that) point explicitly to the Scriptures in an overwhelming fashion.

At the front of the Duck Commander Bible is a set of thirty “Life Changers” articles. These articles retell encounters of Phil and Al Robertson with non-believers. The Robertson’s are not beyond meeting people’s material needs (xiii) and often these stories are quite funny (xiv). This itself those is not edifying for Spiritual growth. However, these “Life Changers” begin with a Scripture reference, end with Scripture references and often tie everything together to the originating Scripture. So even these elements of the Duck Commander Bible are not beyond pointing to the Scripture (after funny stories of course). These are not editions meant to distract from the Scriptures but demonstrate them in the colorfulness of real life.

In conclusion, I did not want to like this Bible. I remain convinced that my reservation for study Bibles and devotional Bibles is valid. But the Duck Commander Faith and Family Bible is worth the price of admission. For individuals looking for more than a simple NKJV text, I find myself surprised to say I can recommend this Bible in its entirety.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

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