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Torrey Gazette is the combined work of everyday Christians blogging on books, family, art, and theology. So pull up a seat and join us. Family Table rules apply. Shouting is totally acceptable.

Look at My Meekness, Don't Look at My Meekness (Part 1)

Look at My Meekness, Don't Look at My Meekness (Part 1)

In this post, my desire is not to point fingers to any particular blogger or blog. I do wish to point out theological and philosophical errors that I’ve observed within these blogs, with love, speaking truth in a tangible and understandable way. So, reader, please know this post does not directly correlate or attack any particular blogger or blog — even remotely. In the same vein, I have not read every modesty blogger’s blog. I haven’t met every modesty blogger. This post is based solely on what I’ve (repeatedly) seen. 

Charis-Kairos (The Tears of Christ) by Makoto Fujiumura

Charis-Kairos (The Tears of Christ) by Makoto Fujiumura

For those of you are who are unaware, modesty blogs are blogs in which women (particularly young women, although there are some exceptions), document their journey through the Biblical principle of dressing modestly. These blogs have one goal: to encourage women of all ages to be conformed to the image of Christ, with emphasis on how they how they clothe themselves. 

The problems with modesty blogs are multifaceted, and I hope to communicate those problems in an understandable way. My primary problem with modesty blogs is simple: they are taking an element of life (clothes), and attributing un-Biblical amounts of attention and devotion to it, to the degree where a woman’s modesty is almost a fruit of the spirit. What I see are women who strive to show what they believe is on inside of their hearts, placing it on the outside, and in the process working their way to a godly reputation. For instance, if those of you who have ever gone on modesty blogs — have you ever seen a modesty blog done modestly? I haven’t. 

Clothes are clothes. They can show personality, they can show a variety of things — skin, not skin, hips, ankles, etc. Clothes can be made beautifully, or awfully. What I witness though time and time again on these blogs are not goals that are Christ-centered, but man centered. I firmly believe that all things should be executed with truth, goodness, and beauty, and that is not what I have seen on the internet. These women who strive to show their inner beauty end up revealing far more things than they intended, whether they realize it or not. These women are all too often trying to turn fabric and clothes into what essentially become the physical manifestation of humility and meekness. 

Clothing is not the physical manifestation of humility and meekness — Christ was. Christ created clothing. Christ continues to cover us, in ways that transcend fabric. Somehow, this is lost within the modesty blogosphere. I see time and time again modesty blogs that are Gospel-less: they are focused on the works, and lack clear purpose. The beauty of a woman is not dependent on what she wears. Clothing can be beautiful, but it does not sanctify, nor do it show how sanctified a woman is or isn’t. This is not emphasized enough, and cannot be emphasized enough. A woman is just as beautiful whether she is wearing Louboutins and Ted Baker’s Fall collection as she is wearing a denim skirt and turtle neck. Why? Because of the imago Dei, and because of Christ’s righteousness. That’s why: nothing more or nothing less. 

The Lies We [Don't] Tell Children

Contextual Uncleanness & God's Covenant in Ezekiel 36

Contextual Uncleanness & God's Covenant in Ezekiel 36